Wared Seger: The Data and Science of Global Television Demand Measurement – “Thinking Out Loud” podcast with Vicky Lins

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Transcript

Introduction
Welcome to “Thinking Out Loud”, the podcast that puts you inside conversations with the most deeply passionate, crazy smart, wildly creative, openly collaborative, quietly wise, fabulously funny, intensely dedicated, and yes, the most thoughtful people in our industry. So sit back and stay tuned. They may just change the way you think.


Vicki Lins

Hello. On today’s podcast I’m speaking with Wared Seger, co-founder and CEO of Parrot Analytics, which is a data science company that empowers media companies, brands and agencies to better understand global audience demand for television content. So you’re a wealth of information. I’m not quite sure where to start. But why don’t we begin by you, just telling us a little bit about your vision for the company, why you founded it and where you’re headed with it?


Wared Seger

Sure, thanks for having me. Essentially, what we do is provide the most comprehensive measure of the popularity of TV content around the world. And then we work with content creators, marketers, media companies, to help them increase that popularity of their content, again, across all platforms, and around the world. Why we founded it is because there is a, you know, a huge need in an industry that is going through a rapid state of flux, right?

So if we see what’s happening around us, and this is all driven by technology trends, right? So broadband penetration, broadband speeds, what’s happening to the industry now is that you’re seeing these this rapid proliferation of content distribution platforms. So out here, we talk about Netflix, Amazon, Hulu is actually over 600, OTT (over the top platforms) around the world today, there’s only 2018


Vicki Lins

Over 600…


Wared Seger

Over 600 OTT platforms around the world. And so what’s happening is that audience are not fragmented across all those different platforms. So you watch Stranger Things on Netflix, and you watch Game of Thrones on HBO, and you watch, you know, Mozart in the Jungle, on Amazon, etc, right? And you watch Cobra Kai on YouTube Premium and some other TV show on Facebook Watch soon, and Instagram TV and what have you.

And that fragmentation what it is leading to is the industry as a whole, increasingly understanding less about what is happening across all platforms from a comprehensive point of view. And so that’s what we do is provide that total visibility in terms of how audiences really engaging and interacting with content and being able to compare that across different platforms. In the information that I was reading, before we met, I noticed that you have a background in science commercialization. Yeah. What does that mean? Well, so. So I think, I think the biggest advances in human history have always been a combination of three things science, technology, and entrepreneurship.

And so you think of anything that the electricity, the internet, the car, any major invention, that’s disruptive society needed to have three factors and needed to have science to invent it needed to have technology to apply the science. So people think technology and science are synonymous – they are not – technology is the application of scientific research and needed to have entrepreneurship to commercialize the technology to the wider market. So that’s what science commercialization is. It’s a combination of those three things.


Vicki Lins

In part of what you’re doing with Parrot Analytics is trying to connect content creators with consumers.


Wared Seger

That’s our mission. Yeah. So why why we do it.


Vicki Lins

Okay. So does that mean you have the secret sauce for how to create a success?


Wared Seger

I wouldn’t say. So I would say that we provide the science to an existing art of creating hits. And it’s always been an art, we don’t try to replace that art. We want to complement it with the science to maximize the odds of creating something that audiences will really love and enjoy and helping creators reach their intended audiences.


Vicki Lins

So we hear a lot about data analytics driving the creation of content these days, Netflix is widely discussed as being excellent at it, you know, we know what you watch, we know how you react to what you watch, and therefore we know what to create to get you to watch more of it. Is that a good encapsulation of what Parrot Analytics is also helping to inform?


Wared Seger

Yeah, so so our mission is to connect creators and consumers right. And we want to do that by enabling data driven decisions along the value chain of content it isn’t the process isn’t as robotic as it sounds in that one statement right there says we know what you watch we know how you react to it and therefore we know how you will be respond to something new that we create, the process more about providing parameters to drive these decisions to enable the industry to minimize waste and inefficiency.

So, some quick numbers to help provide some context $800 billion spent on television content around the world, $800 billion, that’s everything from content investments, content production, distribution, marketing, advertising, advertising alone, in the United States only is a 100 billion dollar market. And so that’s almost a trillion dollar industry is one of the largest industries out there. And it’s probably hands down the least data driven industry out there, given its size. And so


Vicki Lins

Let’s stop there for a second. Yeah,


Wared Seger

Why is that? Well, Case in point 65% of new network TV shows, and the United States are cancelled the first season, the industry today is having the highest cancellation rate ever. So it’s not a question of having more data. The industry today has more data than ever before, right? There’s so much data out there right now. And yet, there’s so much failure out there right now, in fact, more than there ever has been


Vicki Lins

Now there are two ways to look at that you can say that there’s more failure, or you can say that there’s more experimentation? Is it a good thing that networks are tossing out more content and likely to say, Oh, that’s not working, or let’s replace it with this, or that’s moving a


Wared Seger

Very expensive experimentation? That’s very true. So I, you know, I think the industry would like to, I don’t think you would come across an executive that would say, Oh, I would rather, you know, waste $20 million experimenting on a hit that I felt was going to be, but ended up not being a hit as opposed to actually, I can look at some insights to prevent that waste.


Vicki Lins

So, to your point, there’s more data than ever before, are we just not using it right?


Wared Seger

Well, there’s more data, but less insights, I think that’s where a lot of people in the industry, because there’s a lot of buzz out there, you know, big data, big data, and data and insights are not synonymous, you can have a lot of data, but very little insights. And so a large part of what we do is actually work with the industry to help them understand that is not about just, yes truly we process a trillion data points a day, from 249 countries around the world, that’s every country on the planet, and so on. But that’s all buzz, so to speak, right?

What what people really want to know, if I’m a marketer, and I’m going to spend $10 to try to reach the audiences for a program that I’m working on, how should I spend that ten dollars? If you answer that question, that’s all the insights that you need to make that specific decision.


Vicki Lins

So, I’m a marketer, when I’m talking to colleagues deep into the marketing community, I very often obviously, we end up talking about big data and the use of analytics. And I very often hear that we are now so in inundated with data, that it’s harder to call out the insights and identify the key insights that should be the strategic drivers of decision making, both for building the business and for building the brand. So I think that’s what you’re speaking to. So help us understand a little bit about what Parrot Analytics brings to the table in the area of insights to help make that easier and more effective.


Wared Seger

Let’s start from the top I mentioned that what we do is we provide the most comprehensive measure of the popularity of TV content around the world, across all platforms around the world. And the way we do that is by going out and capturing all the different ways that people express what we call demand for content, right. And so so next question is, what is demand for content and demand for content is, well, if I see, let’s take a personal journey to illustrate, if I you know, I’m driving down Santa Monica Boulevard. And I see a billboard of a TV show. The first thing I’ll do if it intrigues me is I’ll pull out my phone, and then I will search for it. I’ll Google it. That signal number one, I’m expressing demand for it.

What is the first thing that usually shows up when you search for something like a TV show an IMDB page usually or YouTube trailer, maybe. So I might watch a trailer and go, Oh, I wonder if I like this show. And then if a really intrigues me I’ll find out more about it, before I invest the time to watch it, I might like go on a Wikipedia page and read about it. These are all signals of demand for content, right at various stages of your intent to consume the content. Some people go all the way and say, you know, I really want to watch is, but I either I don’t have the platform that it’s airing on, or I can’t afford it or it’s too hard or it doesn’t even air in my markets right now. You know. And so they go in, like, download it off the Pirate Bay, or they they stream it over popcorn time or some illegitimate website.

These are all signals of demand for content downloads, now later on people may go into social media and discuss it. And of course, that’s been around for a while. And we’ve been playing with social media data for a long time. And these are all signals of demand. So what we what we do is we say, All right, let’s capture as many of those signals as possible. That’s search data. That’s, you know, trailer views at social media, blogging, micro-blogging peer to peer downloads, you know, BitTorrent streams, popcorn time streams, you know, legitimate file sharing websites, and peer to peer network streaming data, and combine everything together, let’s figure out a system that can merge all those signals together and combine them into a single metric that tells you this is how much demand there is for this specific program today,


Vicki Lins

Right, measuring demand is really different than measuring ratings. Because what you’re saying is, you can track and aggregate demand, which is interest, which is actually more valuable to content creators than what people are able to find and commit to watching. Because there’s a problem, they might be interested in a lot more than they actually are able to locate or consume. Correct. And, and you’re measuring what, what interests them and what they would like to find. And, and watch Not only that, but


Wared Seger

Using the methodology that we do, you’re able to, for example, let’s say that, you know, I’m a fan of Japanese anime, right? I may, like a new anime that has just been released somewhere in the world. And, but it hasn’t yet aired here, in the United States, right, like, no one has bought the rights to that TV show here. So I may go and express a lot of demand for it. But there are no ratings for it here it does an air anywhere. So there’s a lot of differences between the measuring just retrospective ratings of what has happened, what aired on TV, as opposed to understanding that demand for all content in all languages, across all platforms.

I do want to come back to your point about how, you know, your your marketing colleagues are just drowning, with so much right, overwhelmed. And let’s come back to that question now that we have the context about how we do what we do in terms of plugging into all those platforms, and combining them into a single metric, we provide a layer of simplicity, and then, you know, above all that complexity, a layer of simplicity for marketers to be able to drive actionable decisions, for example, so, you know, I’d bump into the Chief Marketing Officer of major US network, and, you know, she would be drowning in data signals that 20 screens on the wall, you know, here’s our YouTube channels, here’s how they’re doing. And here’s our, all of our, like, Snapchat campaigns and our Facebook campaigns.

And, you know, and here’s how we’re doing here and there, and so on. And a lot of these metrics are conflicting, they tell you, they’re telling you different signal to telling you different stories, and it’s so hard to actually understand, okay, what is what what is happening for our brand, if we care about a brand being a TV show, for example, what’s happening with that brand, and how our audience is reacting to it. And so, for example, one of the things that we do is because we plug into all those sources, and then we combine them together into a single metric, we provide a single measure of truth of the demand for that content. as a marketer, you want to always increase the demand for the content. And again, one of the one of the amazing things that we can do is actually measure the demand leading to the launch of a particular program, right. So you can only have ratings once it airs.

And for a lot of TV networks, once the TV show airs, it’s too late to do anything as a marketer. Some networks share prices, either going up or down. If they’re big hits, premieres goes badly, what you want to know is, what is that demand eight weeks out before you premiere? And how is it changing? And how are you marketing campaigns driving up that demand and where it gets really interesting is actually, you know, going back to the sort of my example about simple actionability, you’re a marketer, you have $10 to spend on this, this new program that you’re launching on your network, how do you spend that $10? Do you run campaigns on Facebook? Do you run campaigns on YouTube and of course as a CMO know you’re getting you’re getting bombarded by sales pitches, all these digital platforms, sales people coming to you and saying, come run your campaigns with us, we provide you the best access to your audiences, and so on.

Of course, they all have the same they’re all the best thing since sliced bread. So what you want to find out is for my specific brand, what is the most effective medium for me to reach my audiences. And again, because we plugged into all those sources and combine them together, we can do that we can say, hey, let’s run an A B test about you spend five cents of your $10 across these six different marketing channels, digital platforms, or billboards even. And then let’s measure the impact of each of those campaigns on the demand for your brand. And then that way, you can very quickly discover the Hey, for this particular brand. You know, running marketing campaigns on channel A is the most effective medium. And for this other brand running marketing campaigns on channel B is the most effective medium.


Vicki Lins

So let’s talk about brands for for a minute. There’s there’s a question that fascinates me. And that is the balance of importance now between network brands and program brands. So you’re, you’re measuring demand and interest, but how much does a networks brand equity come into play and what attracts viewer attention and interest versus a program, more and more consumer behavior shifting towards program, you know, people watch programs.

But there used to be a time where the framework that a network provided gave people a comfort zone in which to find programs that they thought they would be more likely to enjoy, based on past experience with the proliferation of platforms today that’s eroding a bit, and content is everywhere, TV everywhere. So what are you seeing across the analytics landscape, we’re


Wared Seger

On the content-centric side of the equation. So we’re very content-centric, because to your point, audiences are now increasingly going and finding the content that they like as opposed to the network brands that they’re loyal to. And there’s certainly still a lot of network loyalty out there, we’re just seeing that drive less and less of consumer consumption. And they’re what they’re demanding. As opposed to, you know, your best friend told you that you really got to check out this new TV show, because it’s the best thing you’ll like it and your next job is to find out where that TV show is and access it regardless of what network it is.


Vicki Lins

That’s right. I mean, marketers today are facing media marketers today are facing the challenge of people need to be aware of what’s out there, and they need to know how to find it. And so you’re helping them with the awareness part of the equation? Are you also helping them with the how to find it part of the equation?


Wared Seger

Yeah, so for example, one of the things that we do with our OTT platform clients is actually support their discovering and recommendation engines. And large platforms like Netflix and Hulu, have publicly come out and said that 70% of all the consumption on a given day happens off Home Screen recommendations, right. So 70% of what consumers watch when they turn on one of these OTT platforms, is what the platform recommends to them. And so increasingly, we’re beginning to trust these recommendations if they’re good, right. And, but often times are really bad.

And so one of the things that we do is drive that algorithmic recommendations as well, from a human marketing point of view. Again, the real decision that they have to make is how do I invest my resources being my time and money to most effectively reach my consumer, my intended audience, and that’s what we help with, we help them understand that your intended audience for this particular program lives on that tiny, little niche digital platform, or actually, they’re really into, you know, that offline type of activity. So that’s the most effective way to reach them.


Vicki Lins

There’s a lot of discussion today around artificial intelligence, I know that at Parrot, you work with a groundbreaking AI platform, tell us a little bit about that, and, and what that looks like.


Wared Seger

Yeah, so it’s nothing scary, as a lot of people like to make it out to be, it’s just a way of processing really large volumes of data really quickly, right? So we process over a billion data points a day from around the world, billion a day worldwide. Yeah, now, you can’t, you can’t put a billion data points on an Excel spreadsheet, it breaks, it breaks after a few million rows,


Vicki Lins

Okay, I’ve never broken an Excel spreadsheet,


Wared Seger

Or you can really easily break it, right. So like, when, when people talk about like AI, it is, it’s a couple of things. One is, there’s just really large data volume processing, data engineering, and processing, so able to combine all those signals. Because when I say, you know, we plug into like searches and torrent, you know, the tweets and, and everything, each of those individual types of activities are like millions and millions of data points, really, really deep data sets.

And so when you talk about AI, one is just processing the data, but two is then extracting insights from that data, again, in a way that is incredibly difficult, if not impossible, to be done manually. Because the volumes of data are so large, so deep, and they’re so wide, that you need to know what you’re looking for, to extract a piece of insight. So what, you know, what our data scientists do, then is build these algorithms build these models that are able to automatically go out and and find what we want to find in the data.


Vicki Lins

And is it an evolutionary program? Is it learn as it


Wared Seger

Yes, and that’s one of the unique features of, you know, the new machine learning systems is that and, you know, neural networks have been around for more than 20 years. But it’s just again, now, with the computational power that’s increasing, were able to process much larger data sets through them and train models much more quickly than we were able to in the past. And so the system learns and improves over time that, you know, for example, we have a to make this sort of more tangible, we have a system that we call demand rank, a machine learning system that assigns a weigjting to the various types of consumer expressions according to how much demand that expression represents.

For example, between the two of us, we can probably agree that if I watch three, back to back episodes of a TV show, I’m expressing more demand for that TV show, then if I press like, on its Facebook page, right? You’ve invested your personal time, three hours of my time watching, right? And then the latter action took me a split second I may even thought about which is a momentary reaction and may not even be a real read on your, your interest. Tells me nothing, a passive impression, it may tell you something at volume, I don’t know.

So, we built a system that’s able to assign a weighting to each interaction. So you watch a trailer? Well, how much is that worth? Because we had to find a way to combine all the signals into a single metric, right? So you watch a trailer world, you are expressing demand for that content? What if you read a Wikipedia page, you’re also expressing demand for that content, you’re engaging with it you’re reading about its background is fictional characters, etc, it’s universe. But how do you combine a trailer view with the Wikipedia page view? What do they tell you as a marketer, three different things. And so we had to figure out a system to be able to assign a meaning to each individual activity at scale.

So that’s, that’s one of the machine learning systems where we set the parameters and then the system learns over time that actually, you know, Facebook likes, and I’m just using that, as an example, like, don’t correlate with anything, they don’t correlate the subsequent viewing. They don’t correlate with where you spend your money, so I’m going to sign them less than less weight. So the system evolves and learns over time,


Vicki Lins

Right now, in the industry across the media landscape. There’s a lot of talk about international growth. And you and I’ve used the word global and worldwide a couple of times in terms of talking about your bits, where is it a lot? Yeah, I’m seeing a shift among our ecosystem of marketers now reporting into the international heads yesterday on stage at TCA David Zaslav pointed out that he’s appointed a Global Head of Animal Planet and said that he believes their model for the future will be one person programming and network globally, as opposed to having a separate international head. So we’re seeing the lines blur of the business coming together. And of course, the OTT landscape eliminates the geographic boundaries all together.


Wared Seger

As of Q1 this year, Netflix has more international subscribers and domestic subscribers. There you go.


Vicki Lins

So you have this incredible worldwide view of the media landscape? Are you seeing cultural differences? Are you seeing trends or information that would help guide the industry in its evolution towards becoming more of a global entity?


Wared Seger

Absolutely, I think again, it’s largely driven by the internet. So and when we plotted where all the trends were heading six years ago, it was really clear that the industry as most other content industries have just gone global. Because it’s so easy to access content now, from the other side of the world, with three clicks on the laptop. So we’re seeing the industry become more global, we’re seeing audiences become more global, and where they find content from and where they pull it from. But at the same time, we’re seeing the industry become more localized as well. And that local nuances are now more important than ever to stand out in local market.

So I’ll give you a couple examples. So we’re seeing we’ve developed this metric, because we have these global datasets, we developed this metric that we call travelability and travelability is a metric that we assign to TV content to help the content creators and marketers behind it understand its likelihood to travel around the world, right, to help them understand its monetization potential, and so on. And we are seeing travelability for content that you wouldn’t even think was possible.

So for example, we were one of the first to break 18 months ago that Skam, a Norwegian drama, was really popular in the United States. And that was weird at the time, because Skam aired in Norway, and a bunch of Scandinavian markets. That TV show had no English subtitles, was in Norwegian, it offered no English subtitles, and yet it was popular in the United States and Canada and Australia, the UK. And so you go, that doesn’t make sense. How could a Norwegian show without any subtitles be popular in the United States. The show doesn’t even air here at the time didn’t air here didn’t have subtitles. It’s just a local show in a local market.

And the show had an innovative format, so a lot of people within its intended audiences. younger audiences, loved it, and are very passionate about it. Some hyper fans watch the show who are bilingual and created their own subtitles, slapped them on top of the TV show, and then re-uploaded it online. So now you could go to popcorn time or to the Pirate Bay, or any you one of your choice of, you know, online streaming sites that consumers do use to this day and age again, because of I think the industry hasn’t really caught up in terms of content distribution, though it’s getting there. But American audiences then found the show and started watching it and so it traveled and six months it was picked up for US adaptation but that wouldn’t have happened had US audiences not caught on to it even before before the show made the travel made the jump here.


Vicki Lins

So technology is enabling us to create fan communities and in very global ways and you’re able to identify and track, even in unintended ways. So you’ve just touched on a topic that’s very big to the industry, which is piracy, and we are behind in addressing that so what intelligence and ability does Parrot Analytics bring to that part of the business equation.


Wared Seger

Yeah so look this is a topic that makes a lot of people in the industry cringe.


Vicki Lins

yes


Wared Seger

For good reason. I’ll tell you a personal story and I’ll come back to your question because I think it’s relevant. So often it is demonized, right, and it’s costing the industry billions of dollars and it’s no doubt costing the industry a lot of money and the industry needs to catch up. But I grew up in New Zealand I’m a kiwi and in New Zealand oftentimes content up until very recently even now, some content does not air on its US airing date. And if you’re a fan of a new TV show, you have to wait three months, six months until whoever the network that’s carrying it in New Zealand have the airing rights the window to air it over there

So, a real life story is Game of Thrones Season Two I believe I think at the time six months after the US airing date. And we know the folks who aired it really well. And you know, I, as a fan of the show, I’m out there going okay, the season finale just aired in the US Okay, I’m 10 episodes behind already take my money, I want someone to take my money and give me the show. So I can watch it, I’ll buy it or you literally couldn’t. You can’t buy it. You can’t spend your money to access the content, it’s not available and it’s not legally available for you to consume.

Now I have two choices as a consumer and you know I said this to the CEO of networks who are our clients and I’m like, take my money you know that like we just can’t we don’t have the rights to and so as I say okay CEO of network X if I am in New Zealand I have I’m gonna I’m gonna pirate your show before it airs. Because I have two choices either I pirate it now and I watch it, or I don’t consume it at all. So I’ve been on record in the industry saying I’ve pirated content before, not because I don’t want to pay for it. But because it was literally the alternative was to not watch it at all.


Vicki Lins

I have never heard anyone use passion as a driver for piracy before I think you make a very interesting point. And when you turn the prism that isn’t necessarily a negative thing. It just poses a challenge that the content developers need to address because if they really want to feel the passion for their content, they need to figure out how to make it available to all as quickly as possible in a fair commercial way.


Wared Seger

Not everyone who pirates content pirates it because they don’t want to pay for it. As an industry. I think our challenge is to make sure that the content is easily available, accessible and convenient for consumers. If it’s not easily available. If it’s not accessible, if it’s inconvenience for consumers, we can’t expect them to go through 20 different hoops to reach our content, or to wait just an unreasonable amount of time to access it. If they’re really they’re already fans. And so that’s our challenge as an industry.

Vicki Lins
And we’re solving for that challenge more effectively domestically than internationally. And I love your your New Zealand story. Because I think we need to think more internationally as we start to look at consumer behavior and access because it is becoming more and more universal.


Wared Seger

And even then, even domestically, you know, a lot of content still doesn’t reach the United States. So you could be a fan of a BBC drama, right. And British drama that just doesn’t air here, or hasn’t been sold in the US yet. But it’s already six episodes in the UK. And so you travel to London, your friends in London, all talking about it, you watch a couple episodes there while you’re in London, you get hooked on it, you come back to LA and you can’t continue watching the show right now, suddenly, again, you’re faced with a choice as a consumer, what do you do, you don’t want to go out and quote unquote, steal it but the alternative is, you know, not watching it as a consumer.

So, you know, again, this isn’t say it’s a positive thing. But it’s just it’s providing context as to why it’s happening. And what we need to do about as an industry. So what we can where we can, you know, come back to the original question when we come out of here is that we provide those insights that intelligence that here are where people really want that content.


Vicki Lins

So just taking a little turn here are the digital platforms or Google, Apple, Facebook, Snap and others is that the new TV, is that where people then start to go to seek a YouTube you mentioned a number of times is, is that the new TV


Wared Seger

I think it’s going to be a hybrid model, right? It’s going to have TV networks not going anywhere anytime soon. But I think very soon, we’re going to stop referring to digital as digital. Right? It’s just everything we have is digital now, we spend half our of our waking hours every single day on digital screens. And so yes, it is the new way of consuming content. But it doesn’t mean that quote unquote, the old way of doing content is going anywhere anytime soon.

So for example, you know, a couple years ago, we heard so much about everything become a more mobile, mobile, right and mobile viewing and everyone is like, you know, optimizing for mobile viewing. And increasingly Now again, the likes of Netflix and Hulu and other platforms have publicly come out and have said that viewing may start like you may subscribe to an SVOD service on your mobile phone or on your laptop but you’ll come back to your TV to watch it right, whether it’s your Smart TV, or they hook up your laptop to your TV to watch it you’ll come back because you want to watch on TV.

So the experience doesn’t change where that’s the medium is not going to, the watch medium is not going to change but the delivery medium is going to change as everything becomes more over the top and again keep in mind this is only 2018 we have we’re still on really bad like 3G and 4G in some cases, fast forward three four years in the future 5G, 6G now with extendible mobile devices and seamless connectivity with our TV screens. Yeah, that’s going to be the new norm.


Vicki Lins

The future is very exciting. It’s happening very quickly. The future isn’t what it used to be. It’s a lot closer to us. But it is coming at us very fast, very furious. So if you could leave us with one or two thoughts to help us get from where we are to where we need to be to keep up with that pace of change. What what are they?


Wared Seger

So I think probably the one thought I think that would summarize the state of flux that’s happening right now is that the currency or the bottleneck to reaching audiences, right? Previously, in the previous model of content distribution to audiences, the bottleneck was distribution, you needed to as a TV probably need to get picked up by networks to have your content distributed. Now, we can go direct to consumer through and through a whole number of host of platforms, and you bottleneck is consumer attention.

And I think as marketers if we keep that in mind that the new currency is consumer attention, and everyone is vying for attention. Not just competing programs and competing networks. Everything is vying for our attention as consumers. If I watch a cat video on YouTube, I’m not watching your TV show, you’re competing with that I’m playing a game. I’m not watching your TV show. If I’m listening to music, I’m not watching your TV show.

Everything is vying for our attention in this day and age because it’s a proliferated environment. We can spend our attention in so many different ways right now. And so the new bottleneck and currency is consumer attention. So a lot of the work that we do with the industry is actually helping them understand what is the most effective medium to capture that attention. And who are you really competing against for your particular program, because it might not be who you think it is.


Vicki Lins

Well, you’ve done a remarkable job capturing our attention. Thank you so much for spending time with us today.


Wared Seger

Thanks so much for having me.

 

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